Wednesday, August 26, 2015

See Me




See me.


Simple words, but full of breath and life and reason to be. I am not invisible. Here I am! You see me. 

There's an episode of Star Trek where Seven, the former Borg drone, is working with the dangerous Omega molecule. But it could explode at any moment, tear apart sub-space, and render warp travel impossible throughout the quadrant! For Trekkies that means all kinds of bad things. But...Omega is perfection to the Borg. It appeals to them as some sort of possibility, just out of reach, that there can be something, no matter how small and brief, that is without flaw. We learn that they tried to stabilize it at some point and destroyed 29 cubes (their ships) in the process. However, they managed to force stability and glimpse it for a fraction of a second. Seven hopes to try again. 

What drove the Borg to pursue this, knowing how dangerous it was? What was the payoff? Captain Janeway says some of the Starfleet scientists theorized that Omega was present at the big bang (gasp!) but she does not see it the way Seven does. Seven needs something from Omega. She tries to convince the Captain to let her try, to no avail. It is simply too risky. So she hopes to make it happen anyway. 

The whole crew is working to destroy the elements that will make up Omega. Seven is desperately working to both see it and then blow it to smithereens before it can explode and kill everyone. Just a second, that's all I need, it seems she's hoping. Just a glimpse. Please

She is unable to stabilize the molecule but, just when we think all is lost, it becomes stable on its own. It just forms and holds its shape longer than any scientific effort had been able to manage previously. And it looks at Seven. She stares into it and has the distinct impression that it is looking back at her. She is seen!

Star Trek sometimes talks about God. Or tries to. Kirk, Spock, and McCoy encounter the sun worshipers in the original series and, despite being accomplished scientists and anthropologists, totally miss that they are son worshipers until Uhura points it out. It was kind of clumsy with everyone wishing they could watch Christianity unfold again on a new planet. But still. 

Deep Space Nine leaned spiritually with the emissary and the Bajoran prophets/wormhole aliens. But Bajor's prophets had a hard time communicating with the people they hoped to lead. Or crush. I am not sure what they were doing since the Bajorans seemed to be on their own a lot. Although, they did vanquish the Dominion's forces in the wormhole when Sisko bullied them with, "You want to be gods? Then be gods!" And they did free Sisko from his depression by pointing out that he chose to exist in his worst memory. 

And Voyager. As far as I can remember, this is the most spiritual of the episodes. It even ends with Seven and Janeway in the holodeck, Seven gazing at a crucifix on the wall of the DaVinci hologram's workshop.

Star Trek tells us about ourselves by looking at us with alien eyes. How they see us tells us what is important in humanity, what makes us who we are. There's this part of me that would love to go out there, traveling through the vastness of space, no longer an odd person but a member of a group of aliens, outsiders, Borg! All the while, pointing out the obvious. Look, a molecule...God! Look, people, reaching out...creation, life!

Always, everywhere I look, God is there, being, making, showing. Some people look for science alone to explain this. To me they are the same, God and science. I am drawn to this, this thing that is looking back at me. Like Seven, seen.

The Omega Directive is season 4, episode 21 of Star Trek: Voyager

24 comments:

  1. Wow. I like how you can see metaphors for God everywhere. I like how you love Star Treck. Of course, I'm sure it's not your only source of spiritual inspiration.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The Bible too! :-) thanks, Myrna.

      Delete
  2. The thing is ... God is there, whether we see Him or not.

    God bless.

    ReplyDelete
  3. What strange that agreement. It is nice that you can see The Lord anywhere in.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, hobbyloes. Everywhere we look, there He is. And everywhere we don't look, there too. :-) blessings!

      Delete
  4. Sandi, first of all, thank you for visiting my blog.It's always great to see a new blogger enter my blog world and especially, one who leaves a comment.

    I hear ya. I often feel like an alien, and I too believe that GOD is everywhere. Science? SURE! I believe He made it. The elegant mathematical precision with which the universe functions? GOD. Why not? We dream, we desire all because there is a seed in us, in all of use that was created by the creator to reach, to explore, to wonder and WANDER to find out who we really are.

    Beautiful piece. Anita

    ReplyDelete
  5. Hi Sandi! I am not a Star Trek watcher, but I was riveted by your description of the Omega story. Isn't it wonderful to see the movement and person of God in a TV show? The stories are there if we will only be open enough to see them. And you were!

    And oh yes Sandi. You are seen. And even more, you are loved and cherished.
    Blessings,
    Ceil

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Ceil! Looking forward to your next post. :)

      Delete
  6. Hello, Sandi :) I found your story fascinating, although I have never watched Star Trek! I know.....I really do have it on my bucket list.....I find this one world strange enough :) I do believe in divine creation, though, and feel God's presence everywhere, especially in nature. Thank you for your sweet visit. I like your question, 'Can you hear me?', Yes!
    Blessings xo Karen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Karen. Nice to meet you!!

      Delete
  7. Awesome story...Thanks for visiting my page too...

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hi Sandi! Yes, our God is everywhere and He watches over His children. Something you can see him in Star Trek! I used to love the original Star Trek shows. Thanks so much for popping in to see me.
    bE a sweetie,
    Shelia ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Sheila! Good to see you. The original Star Trek has a big place in my heart. Used to watch it after school in the 70's. There was nothing like it!

      Delete
  9. Although I've watched Star Trek before, it's my hubby that is a huge fan. I did enjoy the story, though. I, too believe that God is everywhere and I thank Him for creating me, this earth and all of the beauty surrounding us... the sky, moon, stars, oceans, trees, etc. I have prayed to our Father and He has answered my prayers. As small and unworthy as I am, He sees me. Even though I'm not a Trekkie, I can definitely relate to this post so thanks for sharing.

    Have a lovely rest of the day... :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hi, Dee!

      Good to see you. You have a lovely day too. :)

      Delete
  10. Hi Sandi, My goodness sakes … What’s up? **Smile!** Well, usually you are a blogger with a very few choice words of wisdom. Today you have given us a whole book by comparison. And what a great book it is! I love the way you’ve tied it all together. I never thought of you before as a writer, but I see now it is in your profile. Very nice work. To me, the bottom line is God is everywhere. Sometimes God is hard to see, but God is everywhere. Thanks for sharing the Star Trek connection. Wishing you a fine week ahead.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, John! Haha..yes, I am a writer. At least I think I am! I'm working on a novel, my first...er, thousandth, if you count all those I've started and not finished. I have a few short stories published online too. I want to be a real writer one day! But what does that even mean nowadays?

      Delete
  11. Hi Sandi....I'm not into Star Trek but I sure know God is with me at all times.

    Love your visits. Thanks for stopping by. Susan

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Susan! Good to see you.

      Not into Star Trek? I'll just pretend I didn't hear that!

      Delete
  12. Sandi I have never followed the scifi pieces although they are very much part of our media culture. I do believe you took all of the material to a great personal observation. Science and God are One. I would tend to agree. And I enjoyed how you put it together.

    ReplyDelete